Demonstrators protest in Centennial Olympic Park, Friday, May 29, 2020 in Atlanta. Protests were organized in cities around the United States following the death of George Floyd during an arrest in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)
Demonstrators protest in Centennial Olympic Park, Friday, May 29, 2020 in Atlanta. Protests were organized in cities around the United States following the death of George Floyd during an arrest in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

DeKALB - DeKalb County residents are planning Saturday to protest the police killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery Saturday with a moment of silence at Memorial Park and then a march down West Lincoln Highway.

Derek Chauvin, a white ex-Minneapolis police officer was arrested and charged with murder Friday, five days after video showed him kneeling on Floyd's neck for eight minutes while Floyd, a black man, could be heard pleading multiple times that he could not breathe.

The Black Lives Matter/Call For Action protest Saturday at Memorial Park on the corner of First St. and Lincoln Highway across from Walgreens in DeKalb is set for 2 to 5 p.m., according to an event announcement on social media.

After an 8-minute moment of silence, there be a march down Lincoln Highway. The march will head east down Lincoln Highway, turn left on Fourth Street toward the library, go down Oak Street and then head back up North First Street to conclude the protect back at Memorial Park and with a prayer.

Organizers on social media say car caravans are welcome, and participants should post signs in car windows being careful not to obstruct the view of the driver.

Event organizers ask that all participants follow social distancing guidelines regarding group gatherings amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

"Please wear either a mask or face covering and maintain 6 feet of distance of each other," the post states. "I know this will be a large group, but we can do this! Who knows...maybe we can shut down the majority of Lincoln Highway."

Protests in major cities across the country have erupted this week following the death of Floyd, compounded by other recent deaths involving black Americans at the hands of white police officers and people.

On March 13, Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old black woman who worked as an emergency medical technician, was shot eight times to death by Jonathan Mattingly, Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove, police officers in the Louisville Metro Police Department in Louisville, Kentucky. The officers entered her apartment while Taylor and her boyfriend Kenneth Walker were sleeping, supposedly serving a "no-knock" warrant, and did not announce themselves as law enforcement officers before opening fire in the home.

On Feb. 23, Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man, was shot and killed while jogging in a neighborhood near Brunswick in Georgia after being pursued and confronted by two white men, Travis and Gregory McMichael, who were armed with guns. A third white man, William Bryan, was following Arbery in a second car and recorded the fatal shooting on video, a video which did not go public until May 5. After the video went viral, the McMichaels were arrested and charged with murder.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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